Round The World Trip 2017/2018: The Statistics

Round The World Trip 2017/2018: The Statistics

Throughout our year travelling we recorded lots of ‘Travel Statistics’. We all know that travelling is about living in the moment but for us we knew that recording our experiences through photos, a diary and blogs was really important so we didn’t lose these precious memories. We documented three things; the number of beds slept in, the number of beers drank and the number and type of transport taken in each country.

When we started doing this in Russia over a year ago we were not sure if we would continue for the full year however we didn’t realise how interesting this data would be. We soon started to notice how certain countries were particularly alcoholic or that we travelled on 35 trains even though we were only in the country for 23 days (that’s a lot of trains!). I also liked the overall statistics for the whole year. I would be interested for example to know how many beers I drink during one year in London in comparison to one year of travel. Maybe after having a look through this you might be interested in keeping some travel statistics yourself.

 

Table One - Full travel statistics for one year of travel in sixteen countries
Table One – Full travel statistics for one year of travel in sixteen countries

The first table above (table one) shows the number and type of transport we travelled on during our travels. Here you can compare how our modes of transport varied from country to country.

 

Table Two - Overview of travel statistics for one year of travel in sixteen countries
Table Two – Overview of travel statistics for one year of travel in sixteen countries

This second table (table two) shows the total types of transport used during the year. You can see how our main form of transport was by bus at a staggering 138 times. This means on average we took a bus every 2.6 days. You can also see that we took 642 forms of transport in total. This is an average of about 2 forms of transport every day! This is why we called it a year of ‘travel’ and not a year of holiday. Although we only took one Zebu Cart during our whole trip this was probably one of my favourite forms of transport. Bumping along Madagascar’s dirt tracks being pulled by two giant horned Zebu was thrilling and hilarious. Take a look at the video below for a small insight into this experience.

 

Table Three - Bed statistics for one year of travel in sixteen countries
Table Three – Bed statistics for one year of travel in sixteen countries

This third table shows how many beds we slept in in each country during the year. A bed would consist of anything from a double bed in a guesthouse to a mattress on the floor on the top of a volcano to a sleeping bag in a tent in Oman. In addition to recording how many beds we slept in during the year Rich also tried to photograph every bed as well. He definitely missed a few but below are our top three beds from the collection showing you the really variety of where we have slept for the last year.

Our traditional Buddhist temple stay in Yochi-in Temple in Koyasan, Japan
Our traditional Buddhist temple stay in Yochi-in Temple in Koyasan, Japan
Our tent on a beach on Masirah Island, one of many stunning camping spots we found in Oman
Our tent on a beach on Masirah Island, one of many stunning camping spots we found in Oman
Our basic bed with essential mosquito net at a homestay during a trek in the Shan State in Myanmar
Our basic bed with essential mosquito net at a homestay during a trek in the Shan State in Myanmar
Table Four - Beer statistics for one year of travel in sixteen countries
Table Four – Beer statistics for one year of travel in sixteen countries

This final table shows how many beers we each drank during the year. I was actually surprised by how little we drank in total, less than one beer a day. We found that when you kept a close record of your budget you ended up not wanting too much money to disappear into beer and subsequently a hangover. You will notice that we didn’t drink anything in Oman, this is because it is a predominantly Muslim country and to purchase alcohol from a shop you needed a liquor licence which can only be obtained by expats working in the country. Excluding Oman we did find however that beer was available everywhere. The award for cheapest beer during the year was taken by Ethiopia where we got a 400ml draft beer for 27p!

 

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